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Reflux Nephropathy Update 1983 (Contributions to Nephrology) by C. J. Hodson

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Published by S. Karger AG (Switzerland) .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Renal medicine,
  • Nephrology,
  • Kidney Diseases,
  • Medical / Nursing

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsJ. Winberg (Editor)
The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages388
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL12929495M
ISBN 103805538073
ISBN 109783805538077

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A Family History of Vesicoureteral Reflux. Frequent Episodes of Urinary Tract Infections. Pregnancy-Women with reflux nephropathy normally have successful r, there is an increased risk of urine infection during pregnancy. If there is protein in the urine or scarring on the kidneys, there is an increased risk of high blood pressure, and this requires careful . Genre/Form: Congress: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Reflux nephropathy update, Basel ; New York: Karger, (OCoLC) Online version. Reflux nephropathy is a condition in which the kidneys are damaged by the backward flow of urine into the kidney. Urine flows from each kidney through tubes called ureters and into the bladder. When the bladder is full, it squeezes and sends the urine out through the urethra. No urine should flow back into the ureter when the bladder is squeezing. ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: Proceedings of a workshop sponsored by the Kroc Foundation, and held near Santa Barbara, Calif., Oct.

Reflux nephropathy is kidney scarring caused by urine flowing backward from the bladder into a ureter and toward a kidney. (See also Overview of Kidney Filtering Disorders.) Normally, where the bladder and the ureter join, the ureter tunnels slightly sideways through the bladder wall. Reflux nephropathy: Introduction. Reflux nephropathy: A condition which is characterized by reflux of urine from the bladder back up the ureters. More detailed information about the symptoms, causes, and treatments of Reflux nephropathy is available . Reflux nephropathy is kidney scarring caused by urine flowing backward from the bladder into a ureter and toward a kidney. (See also Overview of Kidney Filtering Disorders.) Normally, where the bladder and the ureter join, the ureter tunnels slightly sideways through the bladder wall. The muscles of the bladder wall help keep the end of the. This is called reflux nephropathy. Reflux can occur in people whose ureters do not attach properly to the bladder or whose valves do not work well. Children may be born with this problem or may have other birth defects of the urinary system that cause reflux nephropathy. Reflux nephropathy can occur with other conditions that lead to a blockage.

INTRODUCTION. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the retrograde passage of urine from the bladder into the upper urinary tract. The clinical significance of VUR has been based on the premise that VUR predisposes patients to acute pyelonephritis by transporting bacteria from the bladder to the kidney and recurrent urinary tract infection, which may lead to renal scarring, hypertension, . Kirk P. Conrad, S. Ananth Karumanchi, in Seldin and Giebisch's The Kidney (Fifth Edition), Reflux Nephropathy and Other Tubulointerstitial Disorders. Reflux nephropathy is a disease that begins during childhood and thus is present in a substantial number of pregnant women. The natural history of this disorder during pregnancy was once disputed, but two reports , . Historically, reflux nephropathy was initially understood to be renal parenchymal lesions found in the kidneys of patients who experienced a febrile UTI or pyelonephritis in the face of VUR,.A classic cascade of events due to bacterial infection of the kidneys was described by Roberts ().Schematically, the process of renal scarring initiates with colonization of the urinary tract by . Reflux nephropathy is renal scarring presumably induced by vesicoureteral reflux of infected urine into the renal parenchyma. The diagnosis is suspected in children with urinary tract infections or a family history of reflux nephropathy, or if a prenatal ultrasound shows hydronephrosis.